KWABENA NYARKO OTOO
V.
AMAH ADUTWUMWAA BANAHENE

(2017) JELR 107755 (HC)    
High Court  ·  DM/0291/2016 ·  17 Feb 2017 ·  Ghana
CORAM
CECILIA DON-CHEBE AGBEVEY
Core Terms Beta
petitioner
respondent
parties
ghana
marriage
court
evidence
continuous period
petition
chief
diligent effort
man
section
wife
22nd day of july
adultery
amah adutwumwaa banahene
citizen of the usa
customary law
decree of divorce
entire month
father’s house
following reliefs
full access rights
grant
grant of a decree of divorce
honourable court
issue of the marriage
main difference
matrimonial causes act
presentation of the petition
reason of such adultery
respect of the ancillary reliefs
respondent consents
respondent’s refusal
said child
sc glr
such consent
summer vacation
support of such payments
supreme court
terms of section
trades union congress
united states of america
upkeep of afia anaa otoo
welfare of afia anaa otoo

JUDGEMENT 

The parties were married customarily in February 2009 in Accra. The parties subsequently went through another marriage  in Portland, Oregon in the United States of America on the 23rd day of April, 2010. By a petition filed on the 22nd of July 2016, the petitioner is praying the court for the following reliefs: 

(a) That the marriage between the Petitioner and the  Respondent be dissolved. 

(b) That either Petitioner or Respondent be given custody of  Afia Anaa Otoo with full access rights to either party.

(c) That both parties shall collectively be responsible for the upkeep and welfare of Afia Anaa Otoo including but not limited to her education and health with the Petitioner paying a sum of US$500 every month towards the upkeep of Afia Anaa Otoo. 

(d) Any other orders that this Honourable Court may deem  fit. 

The Petitioner is a Ghanaian living in Ghana and Respondent is citizen of the USA and resides in same. 

In his evidence –in-chief, the petitioner testified on oath that…

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